Fostering Adaptive Expertise In Students - Part 2

SHAILA on March 16, 2013

Jenaplan School Picture

As an educator you may be well aware of the principles outlined by Groff (in part 1 of this article). But you may find it difficult to implement it. The very culture of your school or the bureaucratic management may not like change. However, you have to find ways and means to overcome these barriers. 
 
For example if your institution dislikes change, you can first bounce ideas off your colleagues. Later you can re-frame your methods in such a way that you can convince management. Above all you have to motivate your students, for it will be difficult to bring about a change without their support, says Katrina in her article.
 
Some educators have implemented these principles of innovative learning and one good example is the Jenaplan School in Germany. This school has 450 students in the age group of 3 to 20. Here, you will not find students broken up into grades as is the norm in most other schools. They either learn in mixed-age groups or in groups of their approximate age.  
 
Learning is directed by students and it’s usually project-based. They evaluate the projects of other students and their writing too. Assessment is done by the students themselves or by their peers. This school follows a method of periodic schedule. For example they focus on History for three to four weeks then shift attention to other disciplines. Their teacher is their main mentor while the school also involves parents actively.  
 
The Jenaplan School has won many awards and it’s a role model for other educational institutions preparing students to turn into adaptive thinkers and experts.
 
Shaila is a blogger at Mobicip - the #1 parental control service for iPhone, iPod touch, iPad, iPad mini, Android-based tablets and smartphones, Kindle Fire, and Windows laptops. Shaila loves to write about mobile learning and the increasing adoption of technology and the internet in families.
Photo credit: kerygma / Foter.com / CC BY-NC-ND